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Tuesday, July 26, 2011

NYC, NC Newspapers and Who Really Saved Washington's Portrait?

The majority of my research has taken place in the Midwest. When I did have to venture 'out east' I was thrilled to find one of the sites featured this week, the Italian Genealogical Group. While the group focuses on Italian heritage in New York it has vital record databases for New York City.

Sunday July 24
* Genealogy Books: My Family Tree Workbook - Genealogy for Beginners Author: Rosemary A. Chorzempa - This is a great book to share with your children, grandchildren or other young genealogist.

Monday July 25
* Just Starting in Genealogy? Did your relatives and family friends send out holiday newsletters or did their Christmas cards have letters? Find them and transcribe them because you never know when some comment about a trip or cousin will spark a memory and knock down a brick wall.

Tuesday July 26
* New York became a state on this date in 1788
* The Italian Genealogical Group has transcribed New York Naturalization and Vital Records. Visit: http://www.italiangen.org/

Wednesday July 27
* North Carolina Ancestors? Check out the North Carolina Digitization Project at the North Carolina Archives. Visit: http://archives.ncdcr.gov/newspaper/index.html

Thursday July 28
* Planning a Research Trip to Salt Lake City? The Family History Library has a site that will help you get organized so you can make the most of your trip. Visit: https://www.familysearch.org/locations/saltlakecity-library

Friday July 29
* Genealogy Glossary: Soundex - A method of indexing names most often used in census research. It assigns 1 letter and 3 numbers to every surname. This is to aid genealogist with the various spelling of names such as Smith and Smyth.

Saturday July 30
* The British burned the majority of Washington D.C.’s buildings and legal documents on August 24, 1814 during the War of 1812.

* While Dolley Madison is often credited with saving the portrait of George Washington, it was actually Paul Jennings, one of Madison's slaves, John Suze, a french door keeper and Magraw, the gardner. In 2009 there was a ceremony to honor Paul Jennings actions his descendents were invited.For more on this remarkable story and man visit: Paul Jennings and White House Slavery.



Stay Cool!

Pattie

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